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Jacob van Ruisdael

The Picturesque

1646–1670

Jacob Isaackszoon van Ruisdael (c. 1629 – 10 March 1682) was a Dutch painter, draughtsman, and etcher. He is generally considered the pre-eminent landscape painter of the Dutch Golden Age, a period of great wealth and cultural achievement when Dutch painting became highly popular.

Prolific and versatile, Ruisdael depicted a wide variety of landscape subjects. From 1646 he painted Dutch countryside scenes of remarkable quality for a young man. After a trip to Germany in 1650, his landscapes took on a more heroic character. In his late work, conducted when he lived and worked in Amsterdam, he added city panoramas and seascapes to his regular repertoire. In these, the sky often took up two-thirds of the canvas. In total he produced more than 150 Scandinavian views featuring waterfalls.

Ruisdael’s only registered pupil was Meindert Hobbema, one of several artists who painted figures in his landscapes. Hobbema’s work has at times been confused with Ruisdael’s. There is difficulty in attributing Ruisdael’s work, which has not been helped by the fact that three members of his family were also landscape painters, some of whom spelled their name “Ruysdael”: his father Isaack van Ruisdael, his well-known uncle Salomon van Ruysdael, and his cousin, confusingly called Jacob van Ruysdael.

Ruisdael’s work was in demand in the Dutch Republic during his lifetime. Today it is spread across private and institutional collections around the world; the National Gallery in London, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg hold the largest collections. Ruisdael shaped landscape painting traditions worldwide, from the English Romantics to the Barbizon school in France, and the Hudson River School in the US, and influenced generations of Dutch landscape artists.

During Ruisdael’s last period he began to depict mountain scenes, such as Mountainous and Wooded Landscape with a River, dateable to the late 1670s. This portrays a rugged range with the highest peak in the clouds. Ruisdael’s subjects became unusually varied. The art historian Wolfgang Stechow identified thirteen themes within the Dutch Golden Age landscape genre, and Ruisdael’s work encompasses all but two of them, excelling at most: forests, rivers, dunes and country roads, panoramas, imaginary landscapes, Scandinavian waterfalls, marines, beachscapes, winter scenes, town views, and nocturnes. Only the Italianate and foreign landscapes other than Scandinavian are absent from his oeuvre.

The imaginary landscapes of gardens that Ruisdael painted in the 1670s actually reflect an ongoing discourse on the picturesque in circles of gardening aesthetes like Constantijn Huygens.

The Picturesque
Winter landscape with a harbour, c.1660–1670
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An estuary with smalschips and a galjoot in choppy waters, a village with a church beyond, c.1660–1670
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View of Haarlem, c.1660–1670
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An extensive landscape with grain fields, Heemstede beyond, c.1660–1670
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Landscape with a Village in the Distance, 1646
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View of Naarden with the Church at Muiderberg in the Distance, 1647
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A view of Amsterdam, c.1665–1670
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Landscape with a mill-run and ruins, c.1653
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Road through Fields of Corn near the Zuider Zee, c.1660–1662
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Wheat Fields, c.1670
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Windmill of Wijk bij Duurstede, c.1670
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A View of Haarlem and Bleaching Fields, c.1665–1670
52°19'00.0"N 5°33'00.0"E

Location: Netherlands
Movement: Landscape, Dutch Golden Age

Text: Wikipedia


Posted: July 2019
Category: Painting

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